Joseph Iregbu

Purpose Guy

7 Life Lessons from Judas Iscariot

Judas Iscariot was one of Christ’s disciples. The story of his life must strike a sober cord in our hearts and give us reasons for personal reflection.

Judas

Evidences that Judas started well

There is a danger to think of Judas Iscariot and point finger at him as the one that betrayed his Lord and Master. That’s true; he did. However, let’s not overlook the lessons his sad and damning fall presents to us.

The Bible is replete with indications that Judas Iscariot started well.

When Jesus called him, he responded to the call. He wasn’t only a disciple, he was called an apostle (Luke 6:12-16). He was endued with power to heal the sick, preach the gospel (Mark 6:7) and cast out devils (Matthew 10:1-5).

Judas held a significant ministerial office too. Being in charge of the ‘church’ money wasn’t a minor task. You don’t make a stranger your treasurer; such roles are reserved for people of trust.

Evidences of Judas’s fall and sin

How did a leader with such high office fall from grace to grass? How did Judas completely miss the mark? We learn from scriptures the inner battles in the life of Judas. Unfortunately, he left it too late.

Judas had a ‘love-of-money’ issue (John 12:4-6, 1 Tim 6:10), out of which the devil built a stronghold. He kept his sins hidden from his friends and ministry partners (John 13:27-30).

“Whoever conceals his transgressions will not prosper, but he who confesses and forsakes them will obtain mercy” — Proverbs 28:13.

I’ve often been asked why Judas Iscariot should be blamed since it was prophesied before time that ‘he’ would betray Jesus. Let’s be clear, the Bible NEVER said Judas Iscariot, the son of Simon, would be the one to fulfil that prophecy. Instead, he qualified himself.

On realisation of his fall and sin, Judas failed to remember the word of Jesus:

“But that you may know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins…” — Matthew 9:6

Rather than turn to Christ, he turned to the very people with whom he covenanted to betray his Master. He felt remorse (Matthew 27:3-5) but not genuine repentance (Acts 20:21).

7 significant life lessons from Judas

In studying the tragic life and choices of Judas, I see seven sobering life lessons for every Christian:

  1. Anointing without grace and the fruit of the Spirit can destroy your life. Nobody will get to heaven merely because they performed signs and wonders or received one — Mat 7:21-23.
  2. Jesus is looking for fruits (of holiness), not leaves (of legalism)! — Matt 21:17-20.
  3. Confess your faults one to another (especially when our struggles involve or affect others) – James 5:16. Jesus led a transparent life with his disciples and before all. Judas didn’t. We must.
  4. Be careful how you live and what prophesy your life fulfils. Some say; “God can use anybody!” But to what purpose are you being ‘used’? Remember, God used Pharaoh (to show His power) and he perished!

  5. You cannot serve two masters. You’re either with Jesus or not. There’s no middle ground — John 6:70-71.
  6. “It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God.” — Hebrews 10:31. 

  7. Your heart is ultimately shaped by where you lay your treasures. Where’s the treasure of your soul heart right now? What do you value above God? — Matthew 6:19-21.

Question: What personal life lessons do you learn from the tragic fall of Judas?

Image courtesy of  Fakrul J | Flickr

About Joseph Iregbu

From a homeless, near-school-dropout to living a story worth telling. Purpose is my passion. What's your story?

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3 Replies

  1. Ademoila Oriade

    I need more,this relate with me personally. thank you and God bless you..

    1. Thank you Ade. God bless you.

  2. Timothy

    hi Joseph, i find your article very interesting and helpful….God bless you and your family

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